Commercial Grains Addiction

Commercial Grains Addiction

Yep, I’m a junky. I have to have it. My current lifestyle depends on it.

That is a sad way to start a blog post for a guy that is presenting a lifestyle of self sufficiency, permaculture, homesteading and gardening.

If we are honest with ourselves we can recognize our real challenges. I admit that I am addicted to commercial grains, therefor I can work on finding a remedy.

The first step to finding a solution to a challenge is admitting there there is a challenge, right?

I have a Commercial Grains Addiction.

There I said it.

Ok, so how am I addicted to commercial grains? This addiction is in our how we feed our livestock, pets and even in our own kitchen pantry. Would my family be able to live entirely without commercially grown corn, wheat, oats or rice? I think, ultimately, the answer is yes, but the transition will be slow.

Commercial Grains Addiction: Livestock

Let’s analyze how we feed our livestock for a minute. I have chickens, ducks and goats. I know it would be awesome to have no commercial grains going into them. Right now I am not producing enough food on the farm to feed them full time. We do graze them when we can, but we still supplement with feed sack grains.

My autistic son loves the routine of going to the feed store and buying grains. Right now I enjoy this with him, but I know in the long run I can’t keep that up. I share a message about permaculture, homesteading and gardening. In time I’ll be able to demonstrate my message and shed the hypocrisy.

Commercial Grains Addiction: Pets

Pets? Can we feed them without buying bags of food laced with grains? … ok, I know you can buy “grain free” foods, but the concept is the same. We depend on someone else to provide our food for our pets. Last night I was processing a few chickens. The cats loved the fresh raw organ meats. This is a good first step in providing fresh real food for our pets.  (Now, go find some rats to eat!)

Commercial Grains Addiction: In the Kitchen

Now let’s get serious and look in our own pantry. This isn’t something most people really want to evaluate. We like our addictions. We like our processed sugar and flour. It’s so readily available and makes really really good pastries, right? Yes, I’m right.

Look in your pantry, honestly, and see how much you depend on commercial grains. You will be shocked to find out how much you eat. Corn, Wheat and Rice are in everything. There is nothing wrong with the grains themselves, but the large corporations that provide them to you are not looking out for your best interests. These commercial grains (and commercial foods in general) come with a high price. They are laced with herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers and GMOs.

Some of us can easily go cold turkey on certain food. I am one of those people. It’s very easy for me to make a choice and stick with it. What about my family? I can’t just pull the rug out from under them and expect them to just fall in line. It will take time to transition from our addictions to a more healthy lifestyle of providing for ourselves.

Commercial Grains Addiction: Working on a Solution

I have plans for making my little farm produce for my family. Recently I was thinking about this and started to evaluate what I’m growing and how can I feed my family on these foods. Mostly so far I have focused on growing Tomatoes, Peppers, Herbs and a few other fun things. It would be very difficult to feed my family on those things alone.

What do I need to grow to feed my family? This question has been with me for a long time. I’m learning and I’m on a journey. This year I will be growing Corn, Beans and Potatoes. These three items will provide some protein, fiber and starches for the family. If I combine these foods with the Tomatoes and Peppers that I already grow, then I’m a lot closer to being self sufficient.

My orchard will also provide some vitamins, minerals and some sweet stuff to enjoy. We have Peaches, Pears, Apples, Nectarines, Plums, Blackberries and Mulberries. This year I will be planting more Peaches, Apples, American Persimmon, Native Plum, Paw Paw and Mayhaw. Those trees are on order and will be shipped to my farm soon.

I would love to encourage you to grow your own food. It’s not likely that all can grow everything we need, but please do recognize your addiction to the current food system. We can do better. First admit that you have a challenge, then set out to correct it. Grow some food and buy local. You can do it. I can do it. We can travel this road together.

Take a look at the videos below for some insights on my journey.

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10 thoughts on “Commercial Grains Addiction”

  1. Hi,

    I agree with you. You can’t decide one day to not buy food anymore. It’s a step by step process. Here is my story:
    The first step my family did is to stop as much as possible to buy processed food. We still consume wheat for example but we buy raw wheat an transform it in bread, cakes, etc. The second step was to eat less grain and more roots (sweet potatoes, cassava, etc). The third was to eat less meat (we divided our consumption by ~5) and eat a lot more beans (it exists a lot of different beans here). The fourth step was to try to buy all these things locally. The last step will be to try to grow all these things.

    As always I enjoy your posts

    1. I love your idea of buying raw wheat. I’m currently trying to figure out the most economic way for my family to consume breads without buying the plastic-wrapped loaves at the store.

      I would really like to reduce my intake of commercial meat, too. Out of the meat you still eat, is it acquired at a market, or do you raise it yourself?

      1. I think the most economic way to eat wheat is to do it yourself. It’s fun, easy, customizable, without any additive, etc…

        We buy raw wheat and make bread at most once a week. It’s not hard work. We do small breads and put them in the freeze. We take one bread from the freeze at night, it slowly unfreezes during the night and we put it in the toaster before eating.

        For breakfast, we eat bread, or a kind of pancake made from cassava (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapioca#Brazil), or traditional pancake or couscous from corn or rice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Couscous), or avena with milk and banana for example. We have plenty of option.
        As you see, everything is unprocessed. We only buy raw ingredients.

        We still eat chicken and a little bit of beef. No pig, no fish. We could raise our own chicken, but we can’t kill them. We had chicken for eggs for the last 2 years, but they were like pets for us. I can’t imagine killing them. Now they are with other chickens in a family member. 2015 will be my transition year to become vegetarian (and vegan in 2016 ?).

  2. For the last 2 years, in the month of August, we have cut out all refined sugars and all grains.
    The first year we also cut out all non-natural chemicals as well.
    The no chemicals part was the most difficult. Since that first August, we have continually
    been decreasing the amount of grains we eat. My husband eats no wheat and his joints thank him daily.
    When we do use grains, we use ancient grains.
    We also use very little sugar, but when we do, it is raw pure cane.
    The other thing is what we don’t grow ourselves, we try to find as local as possible.
    I can’t tell you the last time I ate a banana. It is do-able. It’s just that most of us
    weren’t raised that way so it is a bit of a mind game.
    Just found your site ~ great post.

  3. I never thought I would find anyone as addict to grains as my husband was. I would plead with him because he has autism and grains are a real poison for people suffering from this condition, besides he would have to flush out the aluminum (mostly from amalgam on his teeth ) with EDTA and other measures. Now, one day he saw on TV and interview about this surgeon alleging (and he was partly correct) that one of the main reason for heart problems are grains. So he told me he would never eat grains again and I thought to myself, ‘how’ he is already a vegan…how am I going to cook for him? Nevertheless, something strange happens when you stop eating grains (he still eats some oats but that is all and it is very sporadic)…the cravings depart from you. Even I, who eat grains in moderation (love rice and beans, within a few days, I was completely free from the craving. By the way, there’s a book of a mother who became an alternative physician to heal her son from autism and she did with herbs and by avoiding certain foods.

    I hope this help (for anyone who suffers from any chronicle condition, such as autism–my husband had asperges– I suggest a treatment with alternative medicine. My husband is not cured because he refuses to remove the aluminum from his teeth but we flush it out periodically with EDTA and his diet has kept him out of crisis and having an almost normal life. Yesterday we spent quite a few hours conversing, which is a miracle considering his degree of autism.
    Best

      1. Children develop autism because of vaccination. It has a great dose of mercury. If you find an alternative health practitioner I encourage you and your family to treat your son. So many people got cured of autism when treated at an early age. You can find a lot of information if you search autism and mercury. I think ‘grain’ is so much part of our culture, we don’t even realize we are eating it. It was good to see your blog and it brings awareness to us. Thank you for the information

  4. I want to see the video, but YOUTUBE now required a google account, and I so oppose those political giants that track and overshadows our lives, but I get so much of YOUTUBE that I must just have to cave into their demands. I am truly looking forward to seeing this video. Have you ever tested your son for the content of aluminum? just a thought. I will forward the link. Thank you so much.

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